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Food and Chemical Toxicology Journal, Volume 49, Issue 6, June 2011.  This study aimed to review the anti-proliferative and apoptosis powers of Moringa leaf extract on a strain of human cancer cells at varying dosage levels and found those powers to be ‘strong’. As such they determined that Moringa leaf extract “has potential for cancer chemoprevention and can be claimed as a therapeutic target for cancer”.

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Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 15(20):8571-6, November 2014. This literature review from scientists in Malaysia affirms that science is catching up with Moringa’s anecdotal evidence of therapeutic benefits in many cultures and communities over many centuries. Different parts of the plant have been found to have anti-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, anti-hyperglycemic, anti-tumour and anti-cancer properties, and therefore the authors conclude Moringa has numerous applications in the ‘medicinal field’. 

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Oncology Letters, 10(3): 1597–1604, September 2015. This study built on the previous positive research results of Moringa and specific human cancer cells and applied Moringa leaf extract orally to specific human lung and liver cancer cells. The results were ‘significant’ and ‘support the potential of soluble extracts of M. oleifera leaf as orally administered therapeutics for the treatment of human liver and lung cancers.’

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PLOS One, 9(4): e95492, April 2014. This study from Korea also looked at the therapeutic cancer potential of the water soluble leaf extract on human lung cancer cells as well as others. They report that the extract not only “greatly induced apoptosis, inhibited tumor cell growth, and lowered the level of internal reactive oxygen species (ROS)” but also “showed greater cytotoxicity for tumor cells than for normal cells, strongly suggesting that it could potentially be an ideal anticancer therapeutic candidate specific to cancer cells”.

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Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, December 2017. This summary from conservative cancer establishment Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center notes the positive results of numerous studies but calls for more research in clinical studies. It also notes potential adverse reactions and negative side effects, however interestingly these are largely contradicted in the safety and efficacy review published in the Phytotherapy Research journal in 2015 (see below).

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Phytotherapy Research Journal, Vol 29, Issue 6, June 2015.  This paper reviews the animal and human studies researching the potential therapeutic effects of Moringa plant components and extracts. Of the relatively few human studies no adverse reactions were apparently reported, nor from the noted wide use as a food and natural therapeutic by traditional communities for some centuries. Adverse effects were noted at extremely high doses with safe dosage thresholds based on body weight established.

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